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CCRU logoCambridge Coastal Research Unit (CCRU)

Providing highest quality scientific research to underpin sustainable coastal management

Welcome to the CCRU

The Unit's brief is to:

  • Provide scientifically-informed input for the better management of shorelines and their associated ecosystems.
  • Facilitate and promote multi-diciplinary research into all aspects of shallow water marine science by bringing together natural and social scientists in Cambridge University and other governmental and non-governmental research institutions.
  • Inform coastal management and decision-making within governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations in the UK and overseas.

Research projects

A variety of research projects on coastal topics are being undertaken by the CCRU.

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PhD projects

The Unit has an active group of PhD students, undertaking PhD study at the Department of Geography.

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Seminar: Tidal flat morphodynamics: Sediment sorting, self-weight consolidation and marsh distribution'

13th July, 2018

 

BIOGEOGRAPHY & BIOGEOMORPHOLOGY RESEARCH GROUP SUMMER SEMINAR

Thursday 19th July 11:00-12:00, Department of Geography Seminar Room, ALL WELCOME!

'Tidal flat morphodynamics: Sediment sorting, self-weight consolidation and marsh distribution'

Dr Zeng Zhou, Associate Professor in Coastal Geomorphology

Hohai University, Nanjing, China

How strong a storm destroys protective coastal marshes?

12th July, 2018

 

The new NERC-funded RESIST project, led by the Department's Iris Möller, will investigate resistance of coastal salt marshes to extreme storms. Salt marshes contribute to the wave buffering function of shallow water regions on the coast, thus acting as a first line of defence against storm surge waves. Their buffering role protects shorelines from the impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise and stormier seas. However, little is known about how resistant these buffers are to continued battering by waves and tidal currents. The project will supply the first ever data on the resistance of marsh structures to waves, showing which soil and plant types cause greater or lesser stability. The team will be able use the data to create a "physical vulnerability index" of coastal wetlands.

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